Welcome

Welcome to First English Lutheran Church.  You’re invited to join a real community of faith and friendship that gathers for worship, relationship building, personal growth, and service to the community and the world.

We’re Lutheran, so that means we believe in grace for everyone. The good news of Jesus Christ, who brings us the love and mercy of God as a gift, liberates us to love as we are loved, serve as we are served, and give as we have been given much.

We welcome people from all walks of life and in all places in the journey of faith and life.  Whether you’re a lifelong Lutheran, a former something else, or a seeker and questioner looking for more to life and a place to explore , we’re glad to have you.  Since 1989, FELC has openly welcomed persons of all sexual orientation to full participation in the church.

Weekly Update: December 12, 2017

Sunday, December 17

Word & Eucharist – 8:30

Faith formation for all – 9:45 am

Word & Eucharist with Baptism – 11:00 am

Advent

We began observing the themes of Advent in our Sunday liturgy on November 12. In some early church traditions, Advent was a longer season of preparation much like Lent, giving more time to emphasize the themes of preparation, repentance, and hopefulness. Since the fourth Sunday of Advent is Christmastime, we’ve had time to share a season with a more quiet, contemplative listening for how God is speaking to us in our waiting.

Scripture stories for Sunday, December 17  (Year B, Third Sunday of Advent)

Isaiah 61:1-4, 8-11

Though the people had returned to Jerusalem from exile in Babylon, they continued to face hardship and oppression. In the language of the jubilee year described in Leviticus 25, the prophet, moved by the spirit of the Lord, announces deliverance for those who are oppressed and comfort for those who mourn.

The spirit of the Lord God is upon me,
because the Lord has anointed me;
he has sent me to bring good news to the oppressed,
to bind up the brokenhearted,
to proclaim liberty to the captives,
and release to the prisoners;
to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor,
and the day of vengeance of our God;
to comfort all who mourn;
to provide for those who mourn in Zion—
to give them a garland instead of ashes,
the oil of gladness instead of mourning,
the mantle of praise instead of a faint spirit.
They will be called oaks of righteousness,
the planting of the Lord, to display his glory.
They shall build up the ancient ruins,
they shall raise up the former devastations;
they shall repair the ruined cities,
the devastations of many generations.
For I the Lord love justice,
I hate robbery and wrongdoing;
I will faithfully give them their recompense,
and I will make an everlasting covenant with them.
Their descendants shall be known among the nations,
and their offspring among the peoples;
all who see them shall acknowledge
that they are a people whom the Lord has blessed.
I will greatly rejoice in the Lord,
my whole being shall exult in my God;
for he has clothed me with the garments of salvation,
he has covered me with the robe of righteousness,
as a bridegroom decks himself with a garland,
and as a bride adorns herself with her jewels.
For as the earth brings forth its shoots,
and as a garden causes what is sown in it to spring up,
so the Lord God will cause righteousness and praise
to spring up before all the nations.

John 1:6-8, 19-28

John’s gospel describes Jesus as the “light of the world.” John the Baptist is presented as a witness to Jesus, one who directs attention away from himself to Christ, the true light.

There was a man sent from God, whose name was John. He came as a witness to testify to the light, so that all might believe through him. He himself was not the light, but he came to testify to the light.
This is the testimony given by John when the Jews sent priests and Levites from Jerusalem to ask him, “Who are you?” He confessed and did not deny it, but confessed, “I am not the Messiah.” And they asked him, “What then? Are you Elijah?” He said, “I am not.” “Are you the prophet?” He answered, “No.” Then they said to him, “Who are you? Let us have an answer for those who sent us. What do you say about yourself?” He said,
“I am the voice of one crying out in the wilderness,
‘Make straight the way of the Lord,’ ”
as the prophet Isaiah said.
Now they had been sent from the Pharisees. They asked him, “Why then are you baptizing if you are neither the Messiah, nor Elijah, nor the prophet?” John answered them, “I baptize with water. Among you stands one whom you do not know, the one who is coming after me; I am not worthy to untie the thong of his sandal.” This took place in Bethany across the Jordan where John was baptizing.

Comments from the Cloud of Witnesses

It is interesting that the calculation theory of the origin of Christmas places the feast at the winter solstice in relationship to biblical accounts of the birth of the Baptist. The festival of the nativity of John the Baptist is on June 24, the old date for the summer solstice, which is the time of the greatest light in the northern hemisphere. But as the world’s light wanes towards the time of greatest darkness at the winter solstice, we come to the feast of the true Light, brighter than the sun, given in the midst of our darkness. Advent is like John when its continuing decrease of light is made to bear witness to the coming of God’s grace in the midst our need. John is present in our Advent when we know this about our observances and our days: They are not the light. But it is not that we simply turn toward the still coming One. Advent is not playacting, pretending to be the people waiting for the Messiah. Every Sunday assembly, even and especially during Advent, is a gathering in the power of the Spirit and in the presence of the risen Christ before the revealed face of God. “Waiting” is our human condition. This text heightens our waiting, turning us toward God and connecting us to the darkness that at every time of the year and in all religious systems waits for the transcendent one.

Gordon Lathrop

[Gordon W. Lathrop, Advent/Christmas, Proclamation 4, Series B (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1990), 28-29]

Sunday Advent Prayer: Hurts, Healings, and Hopes

The season of Advent is traditionally a time of reflection, self-inspection, and preparation for God to be born again into our world.  It is a time to look both backward and forward, a sacred “interim time” as we pass from the old to the new Church year.

In all years, Advent reflections bring awareness of the brokenness of our world; illness, economic issues, war, conflict, and disasters are perennially present.  The past year in this country has been unusually challenging on many levels; for many among us it has been deeply distressing.

Yet God also calls us during Advent to be aware of the world’s vibrant beauty and resilience, and to look and listen for ways to help bring healing to it and to all of God’s people.  The year 2017 has been no different in this respect; amid great distress we have also seen significant acts of caring and healing, hope and recovery.

We come before God who welcomes us to name our hurts, our need for healing, and our hopes for what is to come. Our assembly will take time to reflect on both the past year and our visions for the coming church year with a different question to contemplate each week. We are invited each week to write or draw our responses on prayer ornaments that will be provided for that purpose.  The prayer ornaments will placed on the communion table and then added to our tree beginning this Sunday. Responses will be collected and shared, and will help in discerning where God is calling us to minister in the coming year.

The prayer questions for each week are:
Week one:  During the past year, what did you find hurtful, troubling, or fearful (on a personal, community, church, or society level)?

Week two:  During the past year, what did you find healing, or where did you see a need for healing (on a personal, community, church, or society level)?

Week three: During the past year, what has given you hope or brought beauty (on a personal, community, church, or society level)?

Week four:  During the past year, what practices or actions did you take in response to the things you found hurtful, healing, or hopeful?

Week five:  In the year to come, what change do you hope to see in God’s world?

Week six:  What ministries or activities of our church community were helpful or healing (for you or the world) during the past year?

Week seven:  In the year to come, what existing, different, or new activities or ministries might God be calling us to for the healing of the world and its people?

Companion Café: Wednesday, December 13

Last Companion Café for 2017

Companion Cafe is our ministry of cooking delicious, high quality, fresh dinners and sharing them in community with all who are hungry. We serve beginning at 6:00 PM on Wednesdays, until 7:00 PM. Suggested donation of $5 per plate, $3 for children. To go orders are welcome.

The menu for December 13 is:

Mustard Crusted Pork Loin,

Roasted Brussels Sprouts w Balsamic Vinegar,

Apple Cabbage Slaw

Companion Café will not serve the remainder of the year and will open again on Wednesday, January 17, 2018.

Advent Evening Prayer at First English

Conversations with Zen

Wednesday, December 13, 6:45-7:30 pm

We gather together in the Chapel of the Saints to pray with full attention. As we pause together and create space for Jesus in our hearts, we consider some lessons from Zen. What does sitting meditation have to do with waiting for the birth of Christ? What is a Zen koan anyway? What does letting go of preconceptions teach us about the conception of Jesus in our world? Come participate in quiet evening of prayer.

Sunday Morning Adult Forum: Faith and Politics

Join together on Sunday, December 17 at 9:45 am in the parlor for the last forum in this series as we reflect on issues happening in our nation and how people of faith and the church community respond. All opinions will be welcomed, and we practice attentive and respectful listening to each other, rather than crosstalk and reacting.

Vivaldi’s Gloria – Christmas with Ensemble VIII

Join Ensemble VIII in celebrating the joy of Christmastime with one of the most well-known and beloved Baroque works, Vivaldi’s infectious Gloria. With voices and chamber orchestra, this concert will include other sparkling works of the Baroque that will thrill and inspire.

Poinsettias Available for Order: Deadline Friday, December 15

Poinsettias will enhance the sanctuary at Christmas.  If you would like to contribute to the cost of the flowers, please complete the online form at: http://www.felcaustin.org/forms/poinsettias.

Each plant costs $10.00 and will be available to take on Christmas Eve and the Sunday after Christmas on a first-come, first-served basis. To have an honor, memorial, or thanksgiving listed in the Christmas Eve bulletin, payment must be received by Friday, December 15. Please send a check made out to “First English Lutheran Church” with “Christmas Poinsettias” in the memo. Or, you may use our online donations option:  http://www.felcaustin.org/giving.  The plants are purchased from and support Down Home Ranch (http://www.downhomeranch.org) a 10 acre working farm and ranch east of Austin, where men and women with Down syndrome and other disabilities live with friends who work beside them.

Micah 6 Benefit Christmas Concert: Wednesday, December 20

On Wednesday, December 20 at 7:30 pm, University Christian Church will be hosting a benefit concert for Micah 6 of Austin.

The concert is free and both monetary and food donations

to Micah 6 will be accepted before and after the concert.

The chamber group Amphion Youth Choir is offering their Christmas program which promises to be a fresh and uplifting performance of familiar and diverse Christmas music as we celebrate and support the mission of Micah 6.

Amphion Youth Choir is a community of young choral artists committed to weaving together contemporary, world, and pop music into transcendent experiences. They promote interest in innovative repertoire not normally heard, providing a diverse message of hope and unity. Amphion Youth Choir is a sponsored project of Austin Creative Alliance and is supported in part by the Cultural Arts Division of the City of Austin Economic Development Department.

University Christian Church is located at 2007 University Ave., Austin, TX 78705.

Celebrate Christmas at First English

All are welcome

Wednesday, December 20

Blue Christmas Evening Prayer

7:00 pm

Silence, Candlelight, Christmas Music, Prayer, Grief and Joy, Healing, Hope

A reception follows the service in the Chapel of the Saints.

Sunday, December 24

The Fourth Sunday of Advent

9:45 am  (nursery offered)

We conclude the advent season with Word and Eucharist (nursery offered)

Note: only one liturgy this Sunday morning.  Godly Play and Adult formation will not be offered.

The Nativity of Our Lord: Christmas Eve

4:00 pm  (nursery offered)

Child-friendly, Christmas Story, Sermon, Eucharist, Candlelight

9:45 pm

Festive Christmas Vocal and Instrumental Music

10:00 pm

Candlelight, Chanted Liturgy, Sermon, Eucharist, Special Music

Note: new worship times this year.

There will not be a liturgy on Christmas Day, Monday, December 25.

Sunday, December 31

The Sunday after Christmas: New Year’s Eve

9:45 am 

Christmas Lessons and Carols with Eucharist
Note: only one liturgy this Sunday morning.  Godly Play and Adult formation will not be offered.

As we prepare for Sunday morning…

Sunday, December 10

Word & Eucharist Liturgy – 8:30 & 11 am

 with Healing Prayer

Faith formation for all – 9:45 am

 

Advent

We began observing the themes of Advent in our Sunday liturgy on November 12. In some early church traditions, Advent was a longer season of preparation much like Lent, giving more time to emphasize the themes of preparation, repentance, and hopefulness. Since the traditional four weeks of Advent usually begins Thanksgiving weekend when many are traveling, and the fourth Sunday of Advent is Christmastime, we have little time to share a season with a more quiet, contemplative listening for how God is speaking to us in our waiting. We hope our longer Advent season gives us space to appreciate the Advent season together more fully.

Sunday, December 10  (Year B, Second Sunday of Advent)

Isaiah 40:1-11

In grand, poetic lines, the prophet announces that the exile of God’s people in Babylon is over. The Lord will deliver Israel and will care for her as a shepherd cares for sheep. This word can be trusted, because the only enduring reality in life is the word of the Lord.

Comfort, O comfort my people,
says your God.
Speak tenderly to Jerusalem,
and cry to her
that she has served her term,
that her penalty is paid,
that she has received from the Lord’s hand
double for all her sins.

A voice cries out:
“In the wilderness prepare the way of the Lord,
make straight in the desert a highway for our God.
Every valley shall be lifted up,
and every mountain and hill be made low;
the uneven ground shall become level,
and the rough places a plain.
Then the glory of the Lord shall be revealed,
and all people shall see it together,
for the mouth of the Lord has spoken.”

A voice says, “Cry out!”
And I said, “What shall I cry?”
All people are grass,
their constancy is like the flower of the field.
The grass withers, the flower fades,
when the breath of the Lord blows upon it;
surely the people are grass.
The grass withers, the flower fades;
but the word of our God will stand forever.
Get you up to a high mountain,
O Zion, herald of good tidings;
lift up your voice with strength,
O Jerusalem, herald of good tidings,
lift it up, do not fear;
say to the cities of Judah,
“Here is your God!”
See, the Lord God comes with might,
and his arm rules for him;
his reward is with him,
and his recompense before him.
He will feed his flock like a shepherd;
he will gather the lambs in his arms,
and carry them in his bosom,
and gently lead the mother sheep.

Mark 1:1-8

The Gospel of Mark does not begin with a story of Jesus’ birth but with the voice of one crying out in the wilderness: Prepare.

The beginning of the good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.
As it is written in the prophet Isaiah,
“See, I am sending my messenger ahead of you,
who will prepare your way;
the voice of one crying out in the wilderness:
‘Prepare the way of the Lord,
make his paths straight,’ ”
John the baptizer appeared in the wilderness, proclaiming a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. And people from the whole Judean countryside and all the people of Jerusalem were going out to him, and were baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins. Now John was clothed with camel’s hair, with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey. He proclaimed, “The one who is more powerful than I is coming after me; I am not worthy to stoop down and untie the thong of his sandals. 8I have baptized you with water; but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”

Comments from the Cloud of Witnesses

The way to freedom runs through the wilderness. Hence the first message is that the people must prepare a way, more accurately a street, straight through the wilderness. From Babylonian hymns and from archaeological evidence we know that the high street in Babylon was rather like the Champs Elysees in Paris, leading to the Arc de Triumph. Isaiah wants such a highway for the Lord, running through the wilderness and leading to the temple in Jerusalem, which was to be rebuilt. However, God’s glory is not revealed in splendid cavalcades on great streets or in processions with imposing effigies, but only in everyday history, and above all in the event of the liberation of his people from slavery, through the difficult journey through the wilderness, back to the freedom of Zion. That, Isaiah says, is the way in which God’s glory is made manifest and revealed to all. That is where God’s jealous honor is to be found: in the exaltation of the insignificant, the poor and the lowly, those who are oppressed.

Edward Schillebeeckx

[Edward Schillebeeckx, in Homilies for the Christian People, ed. Gail Ramshaw (New York: Pueblo Publishing Company, 1989), 78-79.]

Sunday Advent Prayer: Hurts, Healings, and Hopes
The season of Advent is traditionally a time of reflection, self-inspection, and preparation for God to be born again into our world.  It is a time to look both backward and forward, a sacred “interim time” as we pass from the old to the new Church year.

In all years, Advent reflections bring awareness of the brokenness of our world; illness, economic issues, war, conflict, and disasters are perennially present.  The past year in this country has been unusually challenging on many levels; for many among us it has been deeply distressing.

Yet God also calls us during Advent to be aware of the world’s vibrant beauty and resilience, and to look and listen for ways to help bring healing to it and to all of God’s people.  The year 2017 has been no different in this respect; amid great distress we have also seen significant acts of caring and healing, hope and recovery.

We come before God who welcomes us to name our hurts, our need for healing, and our hopes for what is to come. Our assembly will take time to reflect on both the past year and our visions for the coming church year with a different question to contemplate each week. We are invited each week to write or draw our responses on prayer ornaments that will be provided for that purpose.  The prayer ornaments will placed on the communion table and then added to our tree beginning this Sunday. Responses will be collected and shared, and will help in discerning where God is calling us to minister in the coming year.

The prayer questions for each week are:
Week one:  During the past year, what did you find hurtful, troubling, or fearful (on a personal, community, church, or society level)?

Week two:  During the past year, what did you find healing, or where did you see a need for healing (on a personal, community, church, or society level)?

Week three: During the past year, what has given you hope or brought beauty (on a personal, community, church, or society level)?

Week four:  During the past year, what practices or actions did you take in response to the things you found hurtful, healing, or hopeful?

Week five:  In the year to come, what change do you hope to see in God’s world?

Week six:  What ministries or activities of our church community were helpful or healing (for you or the world) during the past year?

Week seven:  In the year to come, what existing, different, or new activities or ministries might God be calling us to for the healing of the world and its people?

Companion Café: Wednesday, December 6

Companion Cafe is our ministry of cooking delicious, high quality, fresh dinners and sharing them in community with all who are hungry. We serve beginning at 6:00 PM on Wednesdays, until 7:00 PM. Suggested donation of $5 per plate, $3 for children. To go orders are welcome.

The menu for December 6 is:

Asiago Spinach Quiche, Orange Slices,

Thai Crunch Salad w Peanut Dressing,

St. Nicholas Shortbread Cookies.

Advent Evening Prayer at First English

Conversations with Zen: Sit, Chew, Move

Wednesdays, December 6 & December 13, 6:45-7:30 pm

This Advent on Wednesday evenings, we gather together in the Chapel of the Saints to pray with full attention. As we pause together and create space for Jesus in our hearts, we consider some lessons from Zen. What does sitting meditation have to do with waiting for the birth of Christ? What is a Zen koan anyway? What does letting go of preconceptions teach us about the conception of Jesus in our world? Come participate in quiet evenings of prayer in the midst of an often-busy season.

Sunday Morning Adult Forum: Faith and Politics

Join together on Sunday mornings (December 10 & 17) at 9:45 am in the parlor as we reflect on a number of issues happening in our nation and how people of faith and the church community could respond. All opinions will be welcomed, and we will practice attentive and respectful listening to each other, rather than crosstalk and reacting.  The Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) has adopted twelve social statements since its formation. The first one was adopted in 1991 and is called “Church in Society” available online at: http://elca.org/en/Faith/Faith-and-Society/Social-Statements/Church-in-Society

Texas Early Music Project Concert: An Early Christmas at First English

Join Texas Early Music Project for a multilicious feast of Christmas music through the ages. People in different cultures across the centuries have celebrated this season of expectation and rebirth with sweet Dutch lullabies and joyous English carols, rousing Spanish villancicos and dulcet French noëls, Celtic cradle-songs and exuberant folk-tunes.  We’ve chosen pieces ranging from Medieval Spain and England to Baroque France and Germany and beyond, encompassing more than 500 years of humanity’s hope, love, and joy.  Brett Barnes, Cayla Cardiff, Jeffrey Jones-Ragona, Stephanie Prewitt, Meredith Ruduski, and Jenifer Thyssen are featured soloists, and nationally acclaimed historical harpist Therese Honey joins TEMP’s troupe of solo voices, small chorus, violin, flute, mandolin, viols, and lute.

SCHEDULE 

Friday, December 8, at 7:00 pm,

Saturday, December 9, at 7:00 pm

at First English Lutheran Church

Sunday, December 10, at 3:00 pm

at First Presbyterian Church, 8001 Mesa Drive, Austin

TICKETS

$30 general; $25 seniors (60+); $5 students (at the door only).

Tickets available by cash, check, or credit card at the door or online at https://temp.ticketbud.com/an-early-christmas-2016.

For more information, call 512-377-6961 and leave a message, or email

info@early-music.org.

Micah 6 Sunday: December 10

Sunday, December 10, First English will gather financial offerings for Micah 6 as a part of their year-end appeal. Please make checks payable directly to Micah 6 or use a special offering envelope for cash offerings.

The mission of Micah 6 of Austin is to work together to identify and meet the needs of the homeless and the impoverished in the University of Texas campus area.

They answer the biblical call of Micah 6:8 to do justice through education, dialogue, and advocacy, love kindness by compassionately serving those who come for assistance, and walk humbly with God by providing opportunities for the spiritual growth of those they serve. First English is a founding member congregation of Micah 6. For more information, visit http://www.micah6austin.org/

Men’s Clothing Drive for Micah 6: ends Sunday, December 10

It’s time to go through your closets—or pick up unopened packages of socks and underwear—for Micah 6’s affiliate clothing pantry, Fig Leaf.  Boxes for receiving items are located in narthex, in the hallway outside the parlor and restrooms, and the CDC hall. The men’s clothing drive ends this Sunday, December 10. For more information contact Renee Carlson at 512-657-5540.

Christmas Caroling with FELC: Sunday, December 10

Fa-la-la-la-lah—la-la-la-lah!!  YES!  Get your Santa hats and Rudolf noses ready, it’s time for our traditional caroling afternoon.  Our homebound seniors look forward to welcoming the happy voices of First English friends bringing Christmas cheer.

 

Sunday, December 10, 2:00 – 5:00 pm

Back at church, you’ll be rewarded with seasonal beverages.

No better way to catch the Christmas spirit!

Meet at First English at 2 pm to carpool and get your maps. Parking is limited in some places so carpooling is advised.  All of us will follow a circular route from and back to First English.

If you plan to partcipate, contact Barbara Wiederaenders (bwiederaenders@att.net) or Anne Wiebe (wiebeanne@hotmail.com).

Texas Lutheran University Christmas Vespers

Sunday, December 10 at 4:00 pm

at St. Martin’s Lutheran Church

606 West 15th Street, Austin (no tickets required)

In preparation for the Christmas season, this celebration of music and word honors the integral role music has played in Texas Lutheran’s curriculum and religious and cultural history. Audiences take advantage of the opportunity to hear the ethereal voices of the TLU choirs each year. Titled “Season of Light,” this year’s Vespers service of word and music will feature the TLU Choir, TLU Women’s Choir, Kantorei Chamber Choir, and the TLU Symphonic Winds and Percussion. The music for this service will focus on Advent as the season of hope; honoring the strength of the human spirit, even in the most difficult of times. San Antonio actress, Sam Carter Gilliam, will perform short monologues between the musical numbers which lend context to the music being performed.

Vivaldi’s Gloria – Christmas with Ensemble VIII

Join Ensemble VIII in celebrating the joy of Christmastime with one of the most well-known and beloved Baroque works, Vivaldi’s infectious Gloria. With voices and chamber orchestra, this concert will include other sparkling works of the Baroque that will thrill and inspire.

Poinsettias Available for Order: Deadline Friday, December 15

Poinsettias will enhance the sanctuary at Christmas.  If you would like to contribute to the cost of the flowers, please complete the online form at: http://www.felcaustin.org/forms/poinsettias.

Paper forms are available at bulletin tables at the entrances to the sanctuary.  Each plant costs $10.00 and will be available to take on Christmas Eve and the Sunday after Christmas on a first-come, first-served basis. To have an honor, memorial, or thanksgiving listed in the Christmas Eve bulletin, payment must be received by Friday, December 15. Please send a check made out to “First English Lutheran Church” with “Christmas Poinsettias” in the memo. Or, you may use our online donations option:  http://www.felcaustin.org/giving.  The plants are purchased from and support Down Home Ranch (http://www.downhomeranch.org) a 10 acre working farm and ranch east of Austin, where men and women with Down syndrome and other disabilities live with friends who work beside them.

Celebrate Christmas at First English

All are welcome

Wednesday, December 20

Blue Christmas Evening Prayer

7:00 pm

Silence, Candlelight, Christmas Music, Prayer, Grief and Joy, Healing, Hope

A reception follows the service in the Chapel of the Saints.

Sunday, December 24

The Fourth Sunday of Advent

9:45 am  (nursery offered)

We conclude the advent season with Word and Eucharist (nursery offered)

Note: only one liturgy this Sunday morning.  Godly Play and Adult formation will not be offered.

The Nativity of Our Lord: Christmas Eve

4:00 pm  (nursery offered)

Child-friendly, Christmas Story, Sermon, Eucharist, Candlelight

9:45 pm

Festive Christmas Vocal and Instrumental Music

10:00 pm

Candlelight, Chanted Liturgy, Sermon, Eucharist, Special Music

Note: new worship times this year.

There will not be a liturgy on Christmas Day, Monday, December 25.

Sunday, December 31

The Sunday after Christmas: New Year’s Eve

9:45 am 

Christmas Lessons and Carols with Eucharist
Note: only one liturgy this Sunday morning.  Godly Play and Adult formation will not be offered.